CFLA Scam Report

Scam Report:

Certified Forensic Loan Auditors, LLC.

Subject of this report:

Certified Forensic Loan Auditors, LLC (CFLA)
13101 West Washington Blvd. Suite 444
Los Angeles, CA 90066
310-579-7422
Andrew Lehman, CFLA President/Owner

Warning to Borrowers Facing Foreclosure: In my opinion, a securitization audit or chain of title audit will not help mortgagors who defaulted on their loan win a foreclosure battle in court and such audit services are therefore virtually worthless.  Numerous pundit and court opinions, cited below, support this warning.  You might agree with me after you finish reading this article and following its links to other text.

First, understand the concept of securitization and chain of title audits from this article of denunciation I wrote years ago:

https://livingliesthetruth.com/2015/06/04/how-a-securitization-audit-wastes-foreclosure-victim-money/

Furthermore, see how and why securitization trust beneficiaries can ratify violations of the securitization trust pooling and servicing agreement, and that the borrower has no standing to dispute or enforce such violations. Pay particular attention to the explanation by Storm Bradford in this article:

http://mortgageattack.com/2014/07/27/securitization-audits-worthless-in-spite-of-glaski/

CFLA is a major purveyor of such audit services and conducts training courses to teach others to perform and sell the audits. CFLA aggressively promotes its loan audit, securitization audit, and chain of title audit services to home loan borrowers (mortgagors) who have defaulted on their loans and feel desperate to prevent foreclosure. CFLA gives such desperate borrowers false hope that the borrowers can use their audits and expert witness testimony to avert foreclosure, even though borrowers breached the terms of their loan contracts and really ought to lose their homes to foreclosure. A mortgagor in foreclosure who purchases a loan-related audit from CFLA or any other company has little to no chance of averting foreclosure because of information contained in the audit. The following statements by experts show why.

Florida Foreclosure Defense Attorney Matthew Weidner warned the public against securitization audits in his blog:

MORTGAGE LOAN SECURITIZATION AUDITS ARE A CRIME!
VIOLATIONS.””A person who violates any provision of this section commits an unfair and deceptive trade practice as defined in part II of this chapter. Violators are subject to the penalties and remedies provided in part II of this chapter, including a monetary penalty not to exceed $15,000 per violation.
Just this week I had another client in my office who almost lost their home because they had given thousands of dollars to a loan audit/securitization “expert” who told the to ignore the lawsuit that was filed against them. They did not respond to the lawsuit and the bank was prepared to set a sale. The judge did not have to let my new client defend the case, but the judge recognized that this old, immigrant family had indeed been the victim of a widespread and rampant fraud so the judge allowed them to defend their case and their home is safe…for now. Good call by the judge. Fair. Balanced. So now, I’m going to bust my hump to make sure this client fills out all their paperwork and gets the modification done. Here’s the thing….with their income, they could have had the modification done months ago….if only the scammer had not sold them up the river.
I get variations of the loan audit scam in my office nearly every single day. Hapless consumers are either directly approached by companies or they respond directly to any one of the hundreds of websites that have sprung up everywhere. Here’s the rap: The company or expert will audit their loan, show them how the bank committed fraud or their documents are bad or whatever and the homeowner can use that information to get a free house….for a small upfront fee of several thousand dollars…and maybe a small monthly fee if the mark can swing it.
ANY REPRESENTATIONS LIKE THIS ARE A VIOLATION OF STATE AND FEDERAL LAW!

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has warned mortgagors that forensic loan audits are a scam:

“there is no evidence that forensic loan audits will help you get a loan modification or any other foreclosure relief, even if they’re conducted by a licensed, legitimate and trained auditor, mortgage professional or lawyer.”

California’s Department of Real Estate warned borrowers against forensic loan audits.

This alert and warning is issued to call to your attention the often overblown and exaggerated “sales pitch(es)” regarding the supposed value of questionable Forensic Loan Audits. It is critical to note that a loan audit (audit report) has absolutely no value as a stand-alone document.
Whether they call themselves Forensic Loan Auditors, Certified Forensic Loan Auditors (there are no such certifications in the State of California), Mortgage Loan Auditors, Forensic Attorney-Backed Foreclosure Prevention Auditors, or some other official, important or lofty sounding title(s), there are thousands of individuals and companies that have popped up and appeared all over the State of California. Most of these individuals and companies are unlicensed, and some were previously engaged in illegal foreclosure rescue and loan modification scams.
The DRE has seen a wide variety of claims and sales pitches, where impressive sounding loan review services are offered with the goal of taking your money. Quite simply, the bad players market hope – and all too often, it is false hope.

A Georgia US District Court in Demilio v US Bank issued a scathing indictment of Demilio’s effort to subvert a foreclosure with a CFLA securitization audit.

Having reviewed the Complaint and all appropriate exhibits, the Court finds that Plaintiff has failed to set forth sufficient facts to show he is entitled to relief on any of his asserted claims. In fact, rather than alleging any material facts in his pleading, Plaintiff attempts to “lodge” “[t]he facts and statements made in the securitization audit attached herein.”13Frankly, the Court is astonished by Plaintiff’s audacity. Instead of providing the “short and plain statement” of facts required by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure,14 Plaintiff requires the Court to scour a poorly‐copied, 45‐page “Certified Forensic Loan Audit” in an attempt to discern the basic facts of his case. This alone would be sufficient for dismissal.15 However, the Court is equally concerned by Plaintiff’s attempt to incorporate such an “audit,” which is more than likely the product of “charlatans who prey upon people in economically dire situation,” rather than a legitimate recitation of Plaintiff’s factual allegations.16As one bankruptcy judge bluntly explained, “[the Court] is quite confident there is no such thing as a ‘Certified Forensic Loan Audit’ or a ‘certified forensic auditor.’”17In fact, the Federal Trade Commission has issued a “Consumer Alert” regarding such “Forensic Loan Audits.”18 The Court will not, in good conscience, consider any facts recited by such a questionable authority.19
16 In re Norwood, 2010 WL 4642447, at *2.
17 Id.
18 Id. at *2 n.2; see (Mar. 2010), http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0130‐forensic‐loan‐audits. The State of California Department of Real Estate issued a similar alert entitled Fraud Warning Regarding Forensic Loan Audits (Feb. 2010), http://www.dre.ca.gov/Consumers/ConsumerAlerts.html.
19 See, e.g., Fidel, 2011 WL 2436134, at *1 (disregarding a “Securitization Audit and Forensic Audit” attached as exhibits to plaintiff’s complaint); accord Hewett v. Shapiro & Ingle, No. 1:11CV278, 2012 WL 1230740, at *4, n.4 (M.D.N.C. Apr. 12, 2012) (discussing various “audits” and noting that such documents “confirm the empty gimmickery of these types of claims.”).

State and federal courts across the land have denounced securitization and chain of title audits, and have uniformly ruled against the clients of CFLA or those who relied on “CFLA” audits to save their homes from foreclosure. The end of this report lists 27 court opinions which borrowers should read BEFORE deciding to spend money on a CFLA loan/securitization/chain-of-title audit. None of the judges in those case ruled in favor of the borrower. The Leadbeater v JP Morgan opinion provides this comment in footnote 9:

Judge Madeline Cox Arleo has previously cautioned that she has “concern over the dubious nature of such reports [prepared by Certified Forensic Loan Auditors, LLC.]Hicks v. The Bank of New York, et al., Civil Action No. 15-1620, Letter Order, D.E. 22 (Feb. 22, 2016). The FTC has recently warned consumers to be wary of “forensic mortgage loan audits.” Federal Trade Commission, Forensic Loan Audits, https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0130-forensic-loan-audits (last visited September 13, 2017) (“According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, the latest foreclosure rescue scam to exploit financially strapped homeowners pitches forensic mortgage loan audits.”).

Blogger and mortgage pundit Martin Andelman wrote this about one of CFLA’s attorney-instructors:

Patricia Rodriguez, Attorney at Law –Patricia is another of CFLA’s instructors. She also has been very active representing homeowners. Going back to June of 2012,Westlaw shows her handling 20 cases, (and you can find a list of her cases at that link).
None were any sort of win for the homeowners… in one she was sanctioned by the court and the 19 others were dismissed, many with prejudice or without leave to amend… the three quiet title cases were all dismissed.She also filed a mass joinder lawsuit that was also dismissed.But it’sMcGough v. Wells Fargo Bank, 2012 WL 6019108 (U.S. DC N.D. Ca. 12/3/12), that deserves to be highlighted because in this case, Ms. Rodriguez ended up being sanctioned by the court for violating Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and ordered to attend 20 hours of continuing legal education. Here’s what the court said about Ms. Rodriguez…
The Court is disheartened by counsel’s failure in this case, even in responding to the present motion, to recognize that she has erred. If she had approached her practice with a measure of common sense, Counsel might have reconsidered her position…
And on a very basic level, the Court wishes to remind counsel that if an ordinary person cannot understand what she is saying in her pleadings—a neighbor, friend, or family member—then it is very likely that the Court and opposing counsel will not be able to either. The kind of garbled pleading that counsel has three times submitted to this Court imposes a burden that all involved would like to avoid in the future.
Accordingly, the Court hereby orders counsel, Patricia Rodriguez, to attend a minimum of twenty (20) hours of MCLE-accredited legal education courses, apart from any compliance hours regularly required by the California Bar Association. These hours shall include a minimum of eight hours in complaint-drafting or other legal writing, eight hours addressing the substantive law of foreclosure, if indeed it is an area in which Ms. Rodriguez wishes to continue practicing, and two hours of legal ethics training.
And remember that Patricia is a CFLA Instructor, training lawyers and others around the country in how to represent homeowners in quiet title cases and how to use CFLA’s securitization audits in foreclosure defense.
Look, I understand that foreclosure defense has been incredibly difficult even for the most dedicated and experienced attorneys. So losing is not necessarily a bad thing all by itself. But the way CFLA markets the company’s instructors, experts and seminars as leading the industry is at least misleading.

Andelman wrote a monumental expose of CFLA at this web page, exhaustively detailing numerous reasons to doubt the validity of CFLA audit services and technical competence of its instructors.  See it here: https://mandelman.ml-implode.com/2014/10/homeowner-alert-mortgage-investors-fraud-recoverys-50-2-40-program-cflas-quiet-title-audits-and-experts/ Apparently,  CFLA owner Andrew Lehman threatened to sue Andelman for exposing CFLA. Andelman ended his article with this challenging rebuke:

And Andrew, don’t bother sending me another letter telling me how powerful you are, and how you’re going to sue me for whatever you think you can sue me for… I’ve got an idea of how big and powerful you are… and yet, I still wrote this… so that should clear up any questions you might have as to the nature of my response to such threats. On the other hand, if you want to present any facts that would show me that what you’re doing is actually doing some good, you’ll find me both open and a very reasonable person with whom to converse. I don’t need much, by the way.  How about a couple of cases where homeowners were awarded quiet title when they still owed on their mortgages?  Or, how about even one such case? How about any sort of favorable outcome based on the use of your products and services… or based on your experts testifying Anything, Andrew… can I see anything at all?

Mortgagors facing foreclosure might wonder why they cannot find more consumer complaints against CFLA at sites like RipoffReport.com. Upon visiting that site a search for CFLA under its full name will reveal multiple pages of advertising showing CFLA to be a model company, but no complaints at all. The reason: CFLA’s principal has apparently paid the principal of RipoffReport to remove all complaints against CFLA from the site and replace them with advertisements making CFLA seem honorable. It seems apparent to me that CFLA and its minions have earned so much money selling useless services to troubled mortgagors that  CFLA can afford to pay bribes or issue threats to get webmasters to remove complaints and to get angry customers to retract their complaints. The court opinions that follow prove foreclosure victims cannot rely upon CFLA securitization, chain-of-title, and loan audit services.  Why? Because the borrowers who tried to rely on them lost in court. Caveat emptor (let the buyer beware)…

Court Opinions Showing Borrowers LOSE by Relying on CFLA Audits

Google Scholar search for “Certified Forensic Loan Audit” and “Certified Forensic Loan Auditors” produced 27 results 2019-03-04

  1. DEMILIO v. CITIZENS HOME LOANS, INC. Dist. Court, MD Georgia, 2013

  2. Barrionuevo v. Chase Bank, NA 885 F. Supp. 2d 964- Dist. Court, ND California, 2012
  3. Blanchard v. FREMONT HOME LOAN TRUST 2005-D Dist. Court, WD Washington, 2017
  4. BARRIONUEVO v. CHASE BANK, NA Dist. Court, ND California, 2013
  5. JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA v. Galloway NM: Court of Appeals, 2018
  6. WAN v. PULTE MORTGAGE Dist. Court, D. Nevada, 2014
  7. MANTOVANI v. WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Dist. Court, D. New Jersey, 2018
  8. GILARMO v. US BANK NA AS TRUSTEE FOR CSAB MORTGAGE BACKED TRUST 2006-1 Court of Appeals, 3rd Circuit, 2016
  9. Sarkar v. WORLD SAVINGS FSB Dist. Court, ND California, 2014
  10. VIERA LOPEZ v. BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC Dist. Court, SD New York, 2017
  11. IM v. BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING LLC Dist. Court, SD New York, 2018
  12. Dumas v. JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA Cal: Court of Appeal, 3rd Appellate Dist., 2014
  13. McGough v. WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Dist. Court, ND California, 2012
  14. Hernandez v. RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS, INC. Dist. Court, ND California, 2016
  15. English v. RYLAND MORTGAGE COMPANY Dist. Court, D. Maryland, 2016
  16. Cox v. NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC Dist. Court, SD New York, 2016
  17. LEADBEATER v. JP MORGAN CHASE, NA Dist. Court, D. New Jersey, 2017
  18. Hylton v. JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA Dist. Court, SD New York, 2018
  19. Sanders v. SUTTON FUNDING, LLC Dist. Court, SD California, 2014
  20. Sylvester v. INTERBAY FUNDING LLC Dist. Court, SD New York, 2017
  21. Suggs v. M & T BANK 230 F. Supp. 3d 458- Dist. Court, ED Virginia, 2017
  22. Avila v. MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEM, INC. Dist. Court, SD Texas, 2012
  23. Williams v. Ward Md: Court of Special Appeals, 2016
  24. Stephens v. BANK OF AMERICA HOME LOANS, INC. Dist. Court, North Carolina, 2017
  25. Baker v. CitiMORTGAGE, INC. Dist. Court, Minnesota, 2018
  26. GONSALVES-CARVALHAL v. AURORA BANK Dist. Court, ED New York, 2014
  27. Kennedy v. WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB Dist. Court, ND California, 2015

* * *

CFLA scam report, rev 2

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Neil Garfield Gets TILA Rescission WRONG, AGAIN!

Quack Attorney Neil Garfield just posted this dreck on his LivingLies blog:

Removing Liens Rendered Void by TILA Rescission 15 USC §1635

by Neil Garfield

Client goes into the office of an attorney and tells him/her that a notice of rescission was sent. The attorney without studying the issue says the rescission never happened. And so it goes.

In my opinion once the time limits have expired on claims arising from TILA (which includes the debt) the county recorder should remove the encumbrance from the chain of title or be ordered to do so by a court of competent jurisdiction.

The attorney might be on the right track but for the wrong reason. There literally is no question about the meaning of the TILA Rescission statute 15 USC §1635 because the highest court in the land said there is no question. And without any question there is no room for interpretation. See Jesinoski. 
*
The plain wording of the statute says that once the notice is sent the OLD loan agreement is replaced with a NEW statutory mandatory loan agreement. This is the factor that is missed by most lawyers and judges on trial and appellate courts. The wording of the statute is clear and it is effective by operation of law the moment the notice is dropped in US postal Service mail.
*
It’s not a declaration that the deal is completely gone. It is a change in terms required by statute. Banks have ignored it at their peril but so far successfully.
*
The courts have strained themselves in their rebellion against this statute because they don’t think so much power should have been vested in each borrower by the legislature. So the judges answer to the problem is to pretend that the legislative branch did not say what it said. SCOTUS thought it was putting an end to that nonsense in Jesinoski but most judges continue to ignore the mandate of both Congress and the Supreme Court.
*
 So there we are. In simple terms the average person who has sent a notice of rescission has title to property that by operation of law has no encumbrance thereon.  But the OLD encumbrance from the OLD loan agreement is still in the County records. I think the recording of the notice of rescission is sufficient to bring an action in mandamus against the county recorder’s office to remove the encumbrance from the chain of title, but I can offer no guarantee that a court will order that, even though it is legally and morally correct.
*
In order to do that properly I think it would be prudent to first send a demand letter to the county recorder asking that the encumbrance be removed and asking for whatever instructions they would give in accomplishing the removal.

Bob Hurt responds…

Neil:

You might want to re-read the SCOTUS opinion and the final opinion in the Jesinoski case

The district and circuit court judges both ruled AGAINST Jesinoskis. They concluded that NO TILA VIOLATION OCCURRED, and therefore the Jesinoskis had NO RIGHT OF RESCISSION under TILA.  And SCOTUS, in its Jesinoski opinion, made this statement:

This regime grants borrowers an unconditional right to rescind for three days, after which they may rescind only if the lender failed to satisfy the Act’s disclosure requirements.

You should know that to trigger a conditional right of rescission TILA and its supporting Regulation Z require a violation and notice of rescission within the post-consummation 3-year repose period.  In order to obtain money damages for the creditor’s failure timely to tender and remove the lien, the borrower must sue within one year and 20 days after notice, or counterclaim/sue within one year after initiation of a foreclosure.  As stated in the Hoang case, no federal statute of limitations exists for enforcing the rescission, so the courts must go to state law to find a pertinent statute of limitations.

Jesinoskis claimed that they did not recall receiving the requisite notices of right to cancel, and each had signed an acknowledgement of receipt of the requisite notices.  For that reason the courts relied on the signed acknowledgements rather than on the Jesinoskis’ faulty memories, as indicated in the following excerpt from the opinion:

“The language of the acknowledgment as presented to and signed individually by Larry and Cheryle more than suffices to demonstrate clearly each spouse’s receipt of two copies. There is no indication on the acknowledgment that the Jesinoskis were signing jointly on one another’s behalf. As such, we agree with the Sixth Circuit which interpreted identical language and concluded, “[s]uch clarity should be rewarded with a presumption of delivery that cannot be overcome without specific evidence demonstrating that the borrower did not receive the appropriate number of copies of the Notice.””

Thus, no TILA violation occurred in the Jesinoskis’ loan.  And THAT explains why the courts denied their rescission effort.  It also demonstrates that YOU do not comprehend the simple language of TILA (15 USC 1601), Regulation Z (12 CFR 1026), and the SCOTUS Jesinoski opinion.  For example, take note of section 12 CFR 1026.23(d)(4):

(d) Effects of rescission.

(1) When a consumer rescinds a transaction, the security interest giving rise to the right of rescission becomes void and the consumer shall not be liable for any amount, including any finance charge.

(2) Within 20 calendar days after receipt of a notice of rescission, the creditor shall return any money or property that has been given to anyone in connection with the transaction and shall take any action necessary to reflect the termination of the security interest.

(3) If the creditor has delivered any money or property, the consumer may retain possession until the creditor has met its obligation under paragraph (d)(2) of this section. When the creditor has complied with that paragraph, the consumer shall tender the money or property to the creditor or, where the latter would be impracticable or inequitable, tender its reasonable value. At the consumer’s option, tender of property may be made at the location of the property or at the consumer’s residence. Tender of money must be made at the creditor’s designated place of business. If the creditor does not take possession of the money or property within 20 calendar days after the consumer’s tender, the consumer may keep it without further obligation.

(4) The procedures outlined in paragraphs (d)(2) [and (3) of this section may be modified by court order.

A creditor who knows he did not violate TILA will naturally resist the expensive process of tendering and removing the lien, and of litigating.  So he will simply foreclose (because the borrower thinks he has rescinded and will stop making mortgage payments), or wait for the borrower to sue to force the creditor to tender and remove the lien.  Generally, the borrower must sue or counterclaim in a foreclosure action in order to enforce the rescission, and in section (4) above, that means a court must order the rescission.

Remember that the SCOTUS granted certiorari in the Jesinoski case because the 8th Circuit had ruled that Jesinoskis must have sued within 3 years after consummation in order to enforce the rescission effort. SCOTUS did not deal with the question of whether a TILA violation had occurred or whether and how the courts must settle the differences between borrower and lender in TILA rescission dispute arising because the creditor refused to tender or remove the lien.  The Jesinoski case in the District Court had never gotten to the point of considering whether Jesinoskis had justification for demanding TILA rescission.  The District Court only got to that point AFTER the SCOTUS had rendered its opinion, that the borrowers need not sue for damages within the repose period of 3 years after consummation –  they needed only to send the notice of intent to rescind within the repose period.

And that (as everyone but you seems to know) means the District Court must settle the matter when the creditor (as in the Jesinoski case) claims no TILA violation occurred and therefore refuses to tender or remove the lien until a District Court judge orders it.  That, after all, is why the Jesinoskis sued to enforce the rescission.

When will you stop misleading borrowers into thinking they can rescind under TILA more than 3 years after consummation, or that they can rescind even though no TILA violation occurred?

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Bob Hurt, Writer

Bob Hurt
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Mortgage Attack to Beat the Bank

 

Final Jesinoski Opinion Proves Garfield Wrong

Neil Garfield has repeatedly asserted on his blog that all a borrower needs to do is send a rescission notice to the creditor in order to effectuate a rescission, whether or not a TILA violation occurred.  And he has tried to con ignorant borrowers into paying $3000 for his useless “TILA RESCISSION PACKAGE” of related legalistic puffery.

Here’s proof that Garfield’s theory of TILA rescission, and of the SCOTUS Jesinoski opinion, is plain wrong.

In 2018 the Jesinoskis appealed the District Court ruling against them, and the 8th Circuirt Court of Appeals held this:

On remand, the district court[1] granted summary judgment, concluding the signed acknowledgment created a rebuttable presumption that the Jesinoskis had received the required number of copies. The court also concluded the Jesinoskis failed to generate a triable question of fact rebutting the presumption. We affirm.

JESINOSKI v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 883 F. 3d 1010 – Court of Appeals, 8th Circuit 2018

You can interpret this to mean that a TILA violation is a condition precedent to TILA rescission. No violation = NO RESCISSION.

Stay-In-My-Home Subsumes Pretender Defender Mark Stopa’s Failed Law Practice

What a Mess Mark Stopa Made

Mark Stopa photo
Mark Stopa Before Disbarment

Look at this mess.  Florida Foreclosure Pretense Defense Attorney Mark Stopa loses his bar license, and a well-intentioned attorney takes over his business.  The below email had an attached letter that includes the Florida Supremes’ order suspending Stopa from the practice of law and says his law firm has been dissolved.

It happened because Stopa cheated Foreclosure Defense clients.

That attorney called me on 21 September 2018 to tell me that he found the Stopa law practice in such a mess that he decided to shut it down for good, and that he hoped Stopa’s foreclosure victim client base would reach out to me for help.
———- Forwarded message ———
From: Help
Date: Fri, Aug 17, 2018, 12:55 PM
Subject: Important Time Sensitive Message

Dear Client, Attached is an important letter concerning your case with Stopa Law Firm, P.A. Please review attached letter and stipulation. It is important that you respond.  We thank you for your attention to this matter.

———- END of Forwarded message ———

Why Foreclosure Defense Attorneys Deserve Censure

Now it’s time for a little honesty.  Mark Stopa and thousands of attorneys like him deserve censure and public humiliation because of their horrific record of cheating their desperate foreclosure victim clients out of money and an honest advocacy.  Such attorneys have built their practice on pretending to defend clients against foreclosure, but without doing any research to discover precisely who injured the clients in the loan transaction and how the injuries happened.

If they had done honest research, they would have discovered that upwards of 90% of home loan borrowers have suffered appraisal fraud, mortgage fraud, contract breaches, regulatory violations, legal errors in their documents, servicing abuse, and/or legal malpractice by the attorneys they hired to help save their home.

Why Typical Foreclosure Defense Attorneys Cannot Help Mortgage Borrowers in Trouble

Even the attorney taking over Stopa’s failed practice thought he could help keep foreclosure victims IN their homes.

But, he concluded that he can’t keep the clients in their homes.  He could only do what Stopa did – delay the client’s loss of the home while charging absurd annual and/or monthly fees for the hand-holding until the inevitable foreclosure final judgment and sale of the home occurs.

Why?  Because Stopa and other Foreclosure Pretense Defense attorneys NEVER do the full investigation required to prove that someone injured the borrower in the loan transaction.  And so, they DO NOT KNOW whether and how the borrower got injured.  Therefore, they cannot take legal action against the perps to win compensation for their mortgage victim clients.

SO, they can only DEFEND by seeking a dismissal without prejudice for failure to fulfill conditions precedent to foreclosing, or for lack of standing, or tolling of the statute of limitations.  That means the right creditor will correct his errors and foreclose again, this time winning a final judgment.

What It Takes to Win Compensation

Unless the practitioner PROVES someone involved in the loan transaction or associated activities INJURED the borrower who faces foreclosure for breaching the note, then the vast majority of such borrowers will lose their homes to foreclosure, and the pretender defender attorney will merely delay the process while bilking the foreclosure victim out of monthly payments for the privilege.

In order to discover such injuries, a professional team must analyze the background story of the loan and examine every document in the loan transaction from day one to present time, including litigation documents, servicer correspondence, closing papers, appraisal, loan application, forbearance agreements, loan modification efforts, etc.  Few if any (NONE that I know of) foreclosure pretense defense attorneys have such skill.  Even if some had the skill, they would charge upwards of $15,000 to $20,000 at their hourly rates to do the examination, analysis, and reporting, which take 40 to 60 hours.  What foreclosure victims can afford that?

Why Foreclosure Pretender Defenders Commit Legal Malpractice

The foregoing explains why foreclosure defense attorneys only pretend to defend against foreclosure, and never win actual compensation for their client’s injuries.   And yet, those attorneys hold themselves out as experts in the law.

Think about this.  The creditor accused the borrower of breach of contract by failing to make timely payments.  Doesn’t it make sense that the defending attorney should investigate the circumstances and documents related to the contract in order to find out whether the contract is valid and whether the client suffered injuries in it?

An attorney commits legal malpractice who takes on such a client and fails to perform a comprehensive investigation and go on the attack for the injuries discovered.  And that can justify a legal malpractice action against attorneys like Mark Stopa.  But again, what foreclosure victim can afford such an action?

The Ultimate Solution for Mortgage Victims

The only solution to the above dilemma lies in finding an affordable mortgage examination service.  The borrower should buy that service, and use the information in the examination report as the basis for demanding settlements from the injurious parties, or for filing actions for fraud, breach of contract, and breach of regulatory laws.  In the vast majority of situations, the injurious parties far prefer settling with the borrower than fighting the borrower in a court case that the borrower will surely win.

For more information on the right way to attack the validity of the loan, see http://mortgageattack.com, and fill in the contact form.

Bob Hurt
Consumer Advocate and Mortgage Attack Maven
727 669 5511
Clearwater, FL

Neil Garfield (the Pot) Warns (Calls) Consumers (the Kettle) about Crooked Lawyers (BLACK?)

Attorney Neil Garfield, ever concerned about public exposure to crooked or incompetent attorneys like himself, writes to readers of his Living Lies blog:

Warning: Conduct your Due Diligence on ANY Attorney you Hire

by Neil Garfield Before you hire ANY attorney for a phone consultation, to conduct an analysis of your case, or retain them to represent you, please conduct your due diligence first. A simple google search with their name will usually suffice.

In fact, before you hire Neil Garfield for a consultation, case analysis, or other legal matter I suggest you conduct your due-diligence like you would when hiring any professional.

Always use caution if the Bar has publicly reprimanded an attorney.

If you believe you have been a victim of an unethical Florida foreclosure attorney, please report your experience to the Florida Bar at: https://www.floridabar.org/public/acap/assistance/

Contact me at:

Neil Garfield | March 27, 2018 at 2:54 pm

In the same spirit of consumer advocacy, I decided to help Neil Garfield spread the word about crooked lawyers, in this case Neil himself, if you believe the Florida Supreme Court. Here’s a little information on Neil:

http://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/showstory.php?Story_id=548048

JAX DAILY RECORD MONDAY, AUG. 1, 2016 12:00 PM EST

Supreme Court disciplines 32 attorneys

The Florida Supreme Court disciplined 32 attorneys — disbarring six, revoking the licenses of two, suspending 16 and publicly reprimanding eight.

Two attorneys were also placed on probation and another was ordered to pay restitution.

The attorneys are: […]

  • Neil Franklin Garfield, Parkland, to be publicly reprimanded. (Admitted to practice: 1977) In at least four instances, Garfield accepted money to represent clients and failed to follow through. In one case, Garfield did not perform the work and, when asked for a refund, denied knowing the client. In other cases, he failed to communicate, charged excessive fees, failed to return refunds upon request and failed to timely respond to Bar inquiries.

Frivolous Filings and Bogus Legal Theories

Neil Garfield’s frivolous filings and bogus legal theories have already cost at least one client, Zdislaw Maslanka, a wad of attorney fees in an utterly frivolous action to get his house free even though he remained current in his mortgage payments. As the docket entries below show, the Florida 4th District appellate panel affirmed the 17th Circuit’s dismissal of the case and ordered Maslanka to pay the attorney fees of the two mortgage creditors that he sued.

  • 4D14-3015-Zdzislaw E. Maslanka v. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage and Embrace Home Loans
05/12/2016 Affirmed ­ Per Curiam Affirmed
05/12/2016 Order Granting Attorney Fees­ Unconditionally ORDERED that the appellee Embrace Home Loans Inc.’s September 2, 2015 motion for attorney’s fees is granted. On remand, the trial court shall set the amount of the attorney’s fees to be awarded for this appellate case. If a motion for rehearing is filed in this court, then services rendered in connection with the filing of the motion, including, but not limited to, preparation of a responsive pleading, shall be taken into account in computing the amount of the fee
05/12/2016 Order Granting Attorney Fees­ Unconditionally ORDERED that the appellee Wells Fargo Home Mortgage’s September 3, 2015 motion for attorneys’ fees is granted. On remand, the trial court shall set the amount of the attorneys’ fees to be awarded for this appellate case. If a motion for rehearing is filed in this court, then services rendered in connection with the filing of the motion, including, but not limited to, preparation of a responsive pleading, shall be taken into account in computing the amount of the fee.

Misleading A Consumer about the Law

Last but not least, below see the text of an 8-page report that Neil Garfield charged Vincent Newman THOUSANDS of dollars for, advising a foreclosure defense and TILA rescission strategy. Newman obtained a pick-a-pay loan in 2010 to purchase a home, then defaulted. Garfield idiotically suggested mailing a notice of TILA rescission in 2016, and then suing to enforce it, without regard to the fact that the TILA statute of repose of 3 years for conditional rescission had already expired, and the creditor had not violated TILA. Garfield thereby illustrated his delusional misunderstanding of conditional TILA rescission which the law allows only for non-purchase-money loans like refinances and HELOCS in which the creditor failed to give the borrower required disclosures of the right to cancel and the cost of the loan not more than $35 understated. No such TILA violation occurred in Newman’s case. Thus, Neil Garfield’s incompetent advice, had Newman heeded it, would have caused Newman expense and embarrassment through a frivolous, failing TILA rescission effort.

———————  Garfield’s Expensive Report to Newman —————–

This is a review and report and not a definitive statement of opinion on the entire case strategy.
Since the property is located in Florida and Mr. Garfield is licensed in Florida, he is qualified to
give both expert opinions and legal opinions.

MEMORANDUM
TO: File
FROM:
DATE: February 8, 2016
RE: Vincent Newman and his Wife
Phone No.: 954-554-6487
Email Address: vnewmansr@yahoo.com

JUDGMENT ENTERED 2011,
SALE DATE CANCELED MULTIPLE TIMES
RESCISSION SUGGESTED
FEDERAL ACTION TO ENJOIN USE OF NOTE AND MORTGAGE SUGGESTED

1. The address of the property in question is 6401 Garfield Street, Hollywood, Florida, 33024 in Broward County.

2. The property is in foreclosure. As of December 29, 2015 Mr. Newman reports that he hired an attorney, started modification and is not current on payments.

3. He has requested a review and commentary in connection with his property and his loan.

4. He has already filed a petition for relief in bankruptcy court under Chapter 7 and apparently converted to Chapter 13. Motion to lift stay was filed and presumably granted. The name of his attorney in the State Court action, Case No. CACE10041220 is Evan Plotka, in the 17 th Judicial Circuit for Broward County [Florida].

5. Mr. Newman reports that in 2010 they were 3 months behind in their payments. Acting through a HUD counselor there was apparently an agreement that was reached in September 2010 where they would catch up on the three payments. According to Mr. Newman Wells Fargo broke the agreement, refused to discuss the matter any further and Mr. Newman and his wife apparently were served with a summons and compliant that October 2010. If they have correspondence proving the existence of the deal, then this would be a point to raise in defense as a possible violation of either estoppel 1 or dual tracking, which was not passed until after the agreement.

1 If the agreement can be proven (they will most likely deny it), then even without the Dodd-Frank prohibition against dual tracking, the homeowners reasonably relied upon the existence of the agreement and made payments that were accepted. Wells Fargo has a history of accepting payments under oral modifications and then abandoning the agreement without accounting for the payments — which often makes the default letter wrong as to the missing payments.

6. Disclosures as to the true funding of the origination of the loan, the acquisition of the debt (as opposed to the acquisition of the paper) and the true party in interest who could be plaintiff are all absent, which is the same thing that I have seen as an expert witness and as an attorney many times with Wells Fargo. Many entities, like World Savings and Wachovia boasted they were funding their own loans. This was nearly never true. The loan papers may have been originated back in 2010 but the disclosure of the money trail has never been made.

7. Mr. Newman answered the summons and complaint without the help of legal counsel and served interrogatories on the plaintiff that he says were never answered.

8. He has apparently been through several attorneys that were merely kicking the can down the road to buy more time without making mortgage payments but of course having Mr. Newman make monthly payments to the attorney.

9. According to the registration statement submitted by Mr. Newman the original loan was with World Savings Mortgage which merged into Wachovia and then Wells Fargo. I think what he meant was World Savings Bank which was acquired by Wachovia Bank which in turn was acquired by Wells Fargo Bank. The case was filed as Wells Fargo Bank as plaintiff. From prior experience we know that this is probably a ruse intended to cover up the fact that they don’t know who the creditor is and they are hoping that a judge will simply take their word for it.

10. Mr. Newman has provided a docket from the Clerk of the Circuit Court which indicates that the property has been set for sale several times. This would indicate in turn that a final judgment of foreclosure was entered. However I do not see on the docket the description of an order granting summary judgment or a final judgment of foreclosure entered in favor of Wells Fargo. I presume that such a judgment exists or the sale would never have been scheduled.

11. As of December 30, 2015 Wells Fargo is showing a balance due of $93,979.25, with an unpaid principle balance of $200,338.10, an escrow balance of $31,855.05, carrying an interest rate of 6.5 percent with a maturity date in July 2049.

12. Based upon my knowledge of the parties involved, and specifically in this case Loan No. 0483028569 2 , I believe that the loan is in fact claimed by a trust which in fact does not own it. The loan was in my opinion most likely never funded by World Savings Bank, Wachovia or Wells Fargo. It is my opinion that none of those entities paid for either the origination or the acquisition of the loan and that any documents to the contrary are fabricated and most likely forged. The system at Wells Fargo if this case actually goes to trial at some point will show that probably Fanny Mae or Freddie Mac was the “investor” from the start. However, since the government sponsored entities generally function in only two areas 3 , it seems unlikely, to say the least, that the investor would be correctly identified in the Wells Fargo system that they would use at trial unless they have changed their method of fabricating business records.

2 Client advises that the loan number changed recently. The reasons for this change should be investigated.

3 The statutory authority of the GSE’s (Fannie and Freddie) allow for them to operate as guarantors and/or Master Trustees of REMIC Trusts who were intended to own the debt, note and mortgage. The “hidden” REMIC Trusts operate the same as private label and publicly registered REMIC Trusts. And they suffer from the same defects — the money from investors never made it into any account owned by the Trust or the Trustee, which means that the Trust could not possibly have paid for loans. The Trust would be an inactive trust devoid of any business, operations, assets, liabilities, income or expenses.

13. For reasons that I will discuss below, it is my opinion that the homeowners in this case should send a notice of rescission and we will discuss whether that notice should be recorded. In addition there should be consideration of a federal lawsuit seeking to enforce the rescission and seeking an injunction to prevent Wells Fargo from using the note and mortgage against the Newmans. I would further add that in my opinion from my review of the documents that were provided by the client there is a strong likelihood of success using standard foreclosure defense strategies.

14. In the court file is a notice of action which states that Vincent Newman and Imelda Newman both stated as avoiding service at the address of 6401 Garfield Street, Hollywood, Florida, 33024. This indicates to me that the service in 2010 was a “drive by” service in which no real effort was made to find or serve Mr. or Mrs. Newman.

15. This in turn leads me to believe that this was typical foreclosure mill actions and that Wells Fargo still has not fulfilled its obligation to review the business records to determine the ownership or balance of the loan. Or to put it differently, they probably did know about the problems with ownership and balance of the loan and wanted the foreclosure sale anyway. Based upon my preliminary review it would appear that Wells Fargo Bank made payments to the certificate holders of a trust under a category known mainly in the industry as “servicer advances.”

16. Based upon their statement I would say that their servicer advances totaled more than $90,000.00. The longer the case goes the higher is the value of their claim to recover their “servicer advances.” However, those advances, while made, came from a comingled account consisting entirely of investor money. Therefore there is no actual action for recovery of the servicer advances.

17. The case was apparently filed in January 2011. Or if the case was not filed at that time then additional paperwork was added to the file at that point. Since the case number refers to the year 2010 I am presuming that they filed a skeleton case in order to have the case filed before the end of the year.

18. The complaint is interesting in that, as usual, Wells Fargo does not allege that it is the owner of the debt. It alleges that it is the owner and holder of the note and mortgage. And of course it alleges that a default exists but it does not state the party to whom the money is owed nor the statement of ultimate facts upon which the court could arrive at the conclusion that the actual creditor has suffered a default or loss as a result of the payments being stopped.

19. The alleged loan, which in my opinion was never funded by World Savings Bank, was a reverse amortization (pick a payment) loan. This loan was probably sold in one form or another 20 or 30 times. The capital from the sale of the loans probably funded many other loans.

20. There is a request filed in January 2011 for the original promissory note, and the contact information for the current holder of the note, which was never answered. This might have some relevancy to a claim contesting jurisdiction of the court.

21. While the docket that was sent to me by Mr. Newman did not appear to contain the final judgment for the plaintiff, the documents that he sent and which were uploaded contain a final judgment for plaintiff. The final judgment apparently was a summary judgment in favor of the plaintiff on November 17, 2011 at 1:30 p.m.

22. As expected, the documents in the possession of Mr. Newman contain a mortgage servicing transfer disclosure. Hence we have evidence of the transfer of servicing rights but not transfer of ownership of the debt. 4 In my opinion this corroborates my conclusion that the loan was subject to claims of securitization starting at a time before consummation could have ever occurred. In my opinion the loan was table funded, which means that the actual source of funds for the loan was another party to whom the documents would be “assigned” immediately after, or even before the apparent “closing.”

4 This is especially relevant to the issue of whether the alleged loan is subject to claims (probably false claims) of securitization. Each of the alleged entities in the “Chain” had robust servicing capacities. The transfers of servicing duties makes no sense and explains nothing except that the usual pattern of musical chairs was being employed to confuse the issues surrounding “holder” of the note etc. The presumptions that are ordinarily used for a holder of a note should not be allowed, in my opinion, because of the history of flagrant violations by Wells Fargo and its predecessors. Producing evidence of a pattern of conduct of fabrication, forgery, robo-signing etc should enable the attorney to argue that the presumptions should not apply, thus requiring Wells Fargo to prove the money trial and ownership of the debt, which they will never do.

23. In my opinion the mortgage document was improper in that it failed to disclose a hidden balloon payment. By having negative amortization or reverse amortization, the balance that is owed as principal continues to increase. Under the terms of the mortgage when it reaches 115 percent of the original loan principal, the loan automatically reverts to standard amortization which is what caused so many people, including the Newmans, to default. Borrowers were seduced into taking these highly complex loan products under the supposition that they would later be able to refinance again, taking “equity” out of the home and providing them with the resources to make the payments. The effect of these loans is to cause a balloon payment at the end of a short period of time. Thus the balloon was not disclosed and the term of the loan was not disclosed because the full amortization of the loan was beyond the financial capacity of the “borrower.”

24. In my opinion the assertion by Wells Fargo that it is the investor, the creditor, the lender, or the successor lender is and always has been false. It appears that no sale of the property has taken place and that none is scheduled based upon information I received from Mr. Newman on December 29, 2015 in a telephone consultation. Even though a judgment has been entered, it is my opinion that the rights and obligations of the parties are still defined by the alleged note and the alleged mortgage. Hence the sending of a notice of rescission and the recording of a notice of interest in real property under Florida Statute 712.05 would be appropriate as a strategy. I also think that an action filed in federal court to enjoin Wells Fargo from the use of the note and mortgage would be appropriate. The basis for the action would be, after notice of rescission had been sent, and presumably after the 20 days from receipt of the notice of rescission had expired, the loan contract was cancelled, the note and mortgage became void as of the date of mailing of the notice of rescission.

25. There is also another strategy of alleging a fraud upon the court, but I don’t think that would get much traction.

26. What I think can get some traction is a lawsuit against Wells Fargo for having presented the false evidence to the court. The difference is that you are not accusing the court of wrongdoing, you are accusing Wells Fargo of wrongdoing and taking advantages. I believe that considering the history that the Newmans report in their narrative that substantial compensatory damages might be awarded, but that punitive damages do not appear to be likely at this time. That is not to say that punitive damages will not be awarded. As time goes on, more and more courts are becoming aware of the fact that the type of foreclosure system has been a sham. Each time another judgment for settlement is reached it becomes apparent that the banks are continuing to engage in the same behavior and simply paying fines for it as a cost of doing business.

27. As Mr. Newman knows, I do not accept many engagements to directly represent homeowners in these actions. I think that in this case I would be willing to accept the engagement, along with co-counsel, Patrick Giunta. I would have to review this file with him to confirm, but the likelihood is that the initial retainer would be in excess of $5,000.00 and that the monthly payment of our fee would be at least $2,000.00. There would also be court costs and other expenses amounting to over $1,000.00.

28. Another option is to seek out another attorney who is willing to take on the case and use my services as litigation support. The hourly rate I charge for all matters, whether as attorney or expert witness is $650.00. The hourly rate of most other attorneys is significantly below that. The actual amount of work required from me if I am in the position of litigation support would be vastly reduced and thus the expense of having me work on the Newman file would be significantly reduced, enabling the Newmans to hire counsel who is receptive to me providing litigation support.

29. In all engagements, in which I am the attorney, or providing litigation support, there is also a contingency fee that varies from 20 percent to 35 percent of any amount paid in hand to the homeowner. Specifically this means that if the case is settled or resolved in a manner in which title to the property becomes unencumbered, the contingency fee would not apply to the house itself, but only to other damages that were paid in connection with the settlement or collection of a judgment.

SpeakWrite
www.speakwrite.com
Job Number: 16039-001
Custom Filename: Newman
Date: 02/08/2016
Billed Words: 2069

SCOTUS: NO 3-year right of rescission without a TILA violation – Eat Crow, Garfield

Crow to eat
Time to Eat Some Crow

Dear Neil Garfield:

You’ll find a serving serving of crow in the 8th Circuit’s post-Jesinoski Keiran v Home Capital, Inc., F. 3d 1127 opinion. After reading it, I imagine you will craft a huge apology to your LivingLies blog readers for misleading them for years about the proper understanding of TILA rescission AND of the Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 135 S. Ct. 790 opinion.

Keirans propounded the same lame excuse as the Jesinoskis. They signed an acknowledgment of receipt of Right to Cancel disclosures, and later gave the court an affidavit claiming they only received one copy, instead of two, each. They appealed the judgment against them to the 8th circuit, then to SCOTUS which granted cert and remanded for consideration in light of Jesinoski. After trial and appeal, the 8th circuit affirmed the trial court’s denial of rescission and damages.

Keiran relied on the same false legal theory that you have espoused for years about TILA rescission, and yet, in the wake of Jesinoski, SCOTUS, the 8th Circuit, and USDC all agree that TILA rescission does NOT work the way you wish it did. The borrow gets NO 3-year right of rescission UNLESS a TILA violation occurred.

The SCOTUS instructs you from the Jesinoski opinion:

Jesinoski TILA Scribble Photo
Whatever did Scalia Mean?

“The Truth in Lending Act gives borrowers the right to rescind certain loans for up to three years after the transaction is consummated. The question presented is whether a borrower exercises this right by providing written notice to his lender, or whether he must also file a lawsuit before the 3-year period elapses.”

There you have the question before the court: does conditional TILA rescission written notice or notice plus lawsuit within 3 years after consummation? Now the fun part, where SCOTUS explains TILA’s extended, conditional right to rescind requiring a TILA violation:

“Congress passed the Truth in Lending Act, 82 Stat. 146, as amended, to help consumers “avoid the uninformed use of 792*792 credit, and to protect the consumer against inaccurate and unfair credit billing.” 15 U.S.C. § 1601(a). To this end, the Act grants borrowers the right to rescind a loan “until midnight of the third business day following the consummation of the transaction or the delivery of the [disclosures required by the Act], whichever is later, by notifying the creditor, in accordance with regulations of the [Federal Reserve] Board, of his intention to do so.” § 1635(a) (2006 ed.).[*] This regime grants borrowers an unconditional right to rescind for three days, after which they may rescind only if the lender failed to satisfy the Act’s disclosure requirements. But this conditional right to rescind does not last forever. Even if a lender never makes the required disclosures, the “right of rescission shall expire three years after the date of consummation of the transaction or upon the sale of the property, whichever comes first.” § 1635(f).”

garfield photo
Neil Garfield of LivingLies

My point: Neil Garfield, you have bloviated that SCOTUS, when it gets a case like Jesinoski back, will agree with YOUR interpretation of TILA rescission law, that a TILA violation is not a condition of the extended right to rescind. Well, SCOTUS did get precisely such a case in 2015 (Keiran), and the justices and the 8th Circuit panel made it clear that NO 3- year right of rescission exists in the absence of a TILA violation.

But who needs the Keiran opinion when Justice Scalia explained conditional TILA rescission PERFECTLY in the Jesinoski opinion?

Eat some crow. I’ll do you good.

Keiran – IF NO DISCLOSURE VIOLATION OCCURS, THE RIGHT TO RESCIND ENDS AT THE CLOSE OF THE THREE-DAY WINDOW.pdf

8th Circuit Finally Puts Jesinoski TILA Case to Rest

The Jesinoskis might finally understand that TILA rescission does not work the way Neil Garfield claims. They spent upwards of $750,000 on trial and appeals, and never bothered purchasing a Mortgage Examination so they could go on the attack.  Instead, the case yo-yo’d between trial appellate courts, and the Jesinoskis ended up losing, badly.  Here’s the summary from the most recent opinion at JESINOSKI v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., Court of Appeals, 8th Circuit 2018 :

Mortgage loan borrowers Larry and Cheryle Jesinoski received Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”) disclosure documents at their loan closing. Pursuant to TILA and its regulations, borrowers may rescind their loan within three days of closing, but the rescission period extends to three years if the lender fails to deliver “the required notice or material disclosures.” 12 C.F.R. 1026.23(a)(3)(i); see also 15 U.S.C. § 1635(a), (f). Admitting that the lender delivered the required notice (the “Notice”) and material disclosures, but arguing that the lender did not provide the required number of copies, the Jesinoskis sought to rescind their loan on a date just shy of the three-year anniversary of loan execution.

The lender denied rescission, asserting the Jesinoskis had signed an acknowledgment indicating receipt of the required disclosures. The Jesinoskis sued more than three years after closing, alleging TILA violations. The district court dismissed the action as untimely, holding that, even if the three-year limitation period applied, borrowers must file suit and not merely provide notice within the three-year time period. On appeal, our court affirmed, recognizing that our circuit had already taken a position on this issue within an existing circuit split. Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 729 F.3d 1092, 1093 (8th Cir. 2013) (per curiam). The Supreme Court granted certiorari and reversed, holding the three-year limitation period applied to the provision of notice rather than the filing of suit. Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., 135 S. Ct. 790, 792 (2015).

On remand, the district court[1] granted summary judgment, concluding the signed acknowledgment created a rebuttable presumption that the Jesinoskis had received the required number of copies. The court also concluded the Jesinoskis failed to generate a triable question of fact rebutting the presumption. We affirm.